As healthy as the horror genre is right now, it’s been a depressingly long time since we’ve been gifted a decent slasher movie – let alone a franchise. The Windmill (AKA The Windmill Massacre) is poised to correct this problem, with a wicked premise, a spooky location and a killer who packs a serious punch in spite of his silly name and massive clogs.

Set just outside of Amsterdam, in The Netherlands, the flick follows a busload of tourists who, after being stranded in the middle of nowhere, take refuge next to the titular structure, thereby leaving themselves at the mercy of the terrifying Miller. All manner of gooey kills and paranormal weirdness ensues in a Holland that is very close to Hell.

Jennifer is an Australian girl on the run from her past who washes up in Amsterdam. In a desperate attempt to stay one step ahead of the authorities, she joins a coach-load of tourists embarking on a tour of Holland’s world famous windmills. When the bus breaks down in the middle of nowhere, she and the other tourists are forced to seek shelter in a disused shed beside a sinister windmill where, legend has it, a Devil-worshiping miller once ground the bones of locals instead of grain. As members of the group start to disappear, Jennifer learns that they all have something in common – a shared secret that seems to mark them all for doom

The Windmill stars Waterloo Road‘s Charlotte Beaumont as Jenny, alongside Fiona Hampton (Kingsman: The Secret Service), Patrick Baladi, Ben Batt and many more. The movie was helmed by Dutch director (and windmill enthusiast) Nick Jongerius, from a script by Chris W. Mitchell.

Wicked Horror caught up with Beaumont and Hampton at Frightfest 2016 to discuss shooting in Holland, how it feels to be covered in blood head to toe all day, every day and why windmills are so damn scary anyway.

Stay tuned to Wicked Horror for the latest horror news and more must-watch interviews from Frightfest 2016, along with reviews of some of this year’s most anticipated movies.Interview conducted by: Joey Keogh
Camera: Mark Vessey
Editing: Richard Waters